How To Read A Tire

Goodyear suggests checking your tire tread depth every 3,000 mi. (5,000 km) or once it reaches 4/32 inch deep. Below are a few simple tests to see if your tires need to be replaced. To find tires that fit your vehicle and buy online click "Find Tires" below or for a professional evaluation, find a Tire & Service Network location near you.
How To Read A Tire >> Tire Care Tips and How to Read a Tire Sidewall | Toyo Tires

How To Read A Tire >> Tire Care Tips and How to Read a Tire Sidewall | Toyo Tires

The number written on the side of the tire will probably look something like 15 x 6-6; The first number "15" refers to the diameter of the tire. This lawn tractor takes an 15" diameter tire. The second number "6" refers to the width of the tire. This lawn tractor takes a 6" wide tire. The third number "6" refers to the diameter of the rim.
How To Read A Tire >> Swing Nostalgia Away: 10 DIY Swings For Kids And Adults

How To Read A Tire >> Swing Nostalgia Away: 10 DIY Swings For Kids And Adults

  • How To Read A Tire Sidewall Continental

    DOT Serial Number. The “DOT” symbol certifies the tire manufacturer’s compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation DOT tire safety standards..

  • Tire Wikipedia

    A tire American English or tyre British English see spelling differences is a ring shaped component that surrounds a wheel’s rim to transfer a vehicle’s load from the axle through the wheel to the ground and to provide traction on the surface traveled over. Most tires, such as those for automobiles and bicycles, are pneumatically inflated structures, which also provide a flexible cushion .

  • How To Read Tire Size

    There are two ways that tire manufacturers display tire size, inches and metric. How to read tire size in inches is very straight forward. Example A 33X12.50R15 The first number is your overall diameter of the tire..

  • Tire Iron Wikipedia

    A tire iron also tire lever or tire spoon is a specialized metal tool used in working with tires.Tire irons have not been in common use for automobile tires since the shift to the use of tubeless tires in the late 1950s Bicycle tire irons are still in use for those tires which have a separate inner tube, and can have a hooked C shape cut into one end of the iron so that it may be hooked on .